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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the fiscal cliff instead of engaging in serious talks to avert the cliff, that includes spending cuts and tax reforms the president once supported. the white house has only offered a joke. i understand we have speaker boehner to the microphones. let's take a listen. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. eight days ago secretary geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on. it had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts. and an indefinite, infinite increase on the debt limit, like forever. four days ago we offered a serious proposal, based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then, there's been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the cliff. instead of cutting spending, the president want to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would c
changes to entitlement spending by the end of these fiscal cliff negotiations. it looks like democratic leaders are right now warming to the idea of raising medicare premiums for wealthier people. you in the past have been somewhat outspoken in terms of your opposition to the idea of altering entitlements in a dramatic way. are you changing your tune? >> no. however, i will say this. we have taken seriously the fact that we have an obligation to our seniors, that medicare has worked for millions, almost 450 million americans, seniors mostly but disabled. and we want to start the discussion about medicare with the promise we are going to keep medicare and find a way to contain the rate of growth in costs under medicare and all health care been helpful. >> sure. >> but we'll meet that obligation to our seniors. that's where i think we start. >> it sounds like you are open to the idea, then, of some tweaks to medicare, to some tweaks to entitlements for revenue. >> my conditions are -- and i think this is true for most democrats -- is that we maintain the universality of medicare, all seni
slow walks the process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> if there is one fact that should not be in dispute, it ought to be this. the president, unlike any other party to these negotiations, has put forward detailed spending cuts as well as detailed revenue proposals. >> ari, the president saying he's willing to make the tough decisions on the spending cuts if the republicans acquiesce on tax hikes. meanwhile, republicans say i need to see the spending cuts first, show me yours first, before i give you anything on the tax hike. it's this game of who's going to blink first. but it really doesn't benefit john boehner to continue this, as we see the public opinion and his brand is really taking a hit on this. >> i think so. we've seen this movie before. there's a lot of enthusiasm for vague cuts but when you have to actually decide what gets cut, even republicans blanch. the bloomberg poll out today shows 50% of republicans think that it's time to raise the taxes on the top 2% because the president has a mandate. that's just republicans. the majorities get even hi
is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> even as the fiscal cliff negotiations drag on in washington, wall street seems to be basically unphased. the dow jones has slipped only about 200 points since the election. why isn't wall street more on edge itself? william cohen is the author of "money and power, hold goldman sachs came to rule the world." the labor department came out with the applications for unemployment aid saying it fell sharply for the last week and stocks basically opened flat this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go
support clinton to succeed president obama. 37% would not. ted nugent weighs in on the fiscal cliff fiasco something he said we drove off a long time ago. he writes in "the washington times" social security, medicaid and medicare spending needs to be slaughtered and let's stop the insanity of the right to vote of any american on welfare. once they get off well taer and are self-sustaining they get their right restored. no american on welfare should have the right to vote for tax increases on those americans working and paying taxes to support them. >>> and "the daily show's" jon stewart says maybe we should go off the fiscal cliff. >> back and forth of offers. it's pretty clear the republicans aren't going to come to the table with anything reasonable. i'll be the one to say it, i know it will be disastrous and doom our economy for years to come, let's go over the [ bleep ] cliff. fine. just leave the negotiating tables and send us over the cliff. you know why? at least for a few seconds, it will feel like we're flying. >> all right. that's going to wrap things up for me today. thanks for
of this so-called fiscal cliff deal? >> well republicans are pushing all along, saying we could actually see a scenario where our members agree to rate hikes. if you brought the real money to the table. aggressive entitlement reform. some kind of medicare overall is what's anticipated. because democrats have said they're not going to touch social security and medicaid is an expansion of medicare. but medicare is the program that was in the offing in the 2011 budget deal that fell apart between the speaker and the president and the republicans are asking him to look at that program. the left is telling him not to. you hear a lot of talk about how they want to focus on the taxes and get us over the fiscal cliff. but as i said before, it doesn't matter what the president says about the debt ceiling fight. republicans are not budging on taxes without entitlement reform. they're willing to go over the cliff and when there's nothing else to talk about but the debt ceiling increase in january, it has to be for medicare reform and exchange. >> dollar figure on entitlement reform, what are you thinki
negotiations over the so-called fiscal cliff stand. for the first time in a while the president has no public events today. on his agenda he has spent the last few weeks as you know on this relentless pr campaign to talk about it. and his lack of a tuesday to do list adds punch to reports like this one in the "wall street journal" with the headline talks take positive turn. >> john boehner, sitting down with the president, seems these two men are getting the job done, from what we hear. >> it is the serious business because they've got to come to a framework at the end of this week if they're going to get it written in time and passed in time so they all don't have to spend christmas in washington. >> that's right,er. wants to get out of town for the holidays. we are book now with our political power panel. msnbc contributor ron reagan and republican strategist. this is where things stand. last night the president's team called boehner, asked for more details on taxes. boehner's office says that they want more details on spending cuts. so here's what senator bob corker had to say on the deal.
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)